Leave

Annual and department day entitlements

The proportion of full-time permanent Public Service employees receiving 25 days or more annual leave as at 30 June 2007 was 42% (28% in 2006). Recent legislative changes that increased the minimum statutory annual leave entitlement appear to have had a flow-on effect leading to increased Public Service entitlements. Refer to Table 12 below for annual leave entitlements since 2003, when this information was first collected in the survey.

Table 12. Annual and departmental day leave entitlements, 2003-2007 (% of permanent full-time staff only 8 )

             
 

Annual leave entitlement

Combined annual & departmental day entitlement

 

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2007

<20 days

30

31

23

12

0

0

20 days

44

45

39

48

35

16

21-22 days

7

7

8

10

12

3

23-24 days

9

8

10

2

11

31

25 days

5

4

15

24

29

30

26 days or more

5

5

5

4

13

20

This year the HRC Survey started collecting departmental day leave entitlement information. These days traditionally covered the working days between the Christmas and New Year statutory holidays. The data shows that in 2007 59% of employees did not receive any departmental day entitlement and 34% received three days entitlement.

The majority (83%) of those employees who were entitled to 23 days or more annual leave had no departmental day entitlement, which may indicate departmental days had been incorporated into their annual leave entitlement.

When adding annual leave and departmental day entitlements together, just over half (50.3%) of permanent full time public service staff were entitled to 25 days or more leave a year.

Sick leave taken

In the year to 30 June 2007, full-time permanent employees took on average 6.5 days of sick and domestic leave 9 , (average of 6.6 days in 2006). Since 2003, when collecting the data started, the average sick leave taken has been stable, ranging between 6.5 and 6.9 days.

Parental leave

As at 30 June 2007, there were 605 employees on parental leave, of whom 589 were female and 16 male (2006 figures were 573 total, 555 females and 18 males).

During the year to 30 June 2007, 718 employees completed a period of parental leave and 100 (14%) of these employees were men. The average length of parental leave for women was 212 calendar days (approximately 7 months) compared with 47 calendar days for men.

A high proportion of employees who had recently returned from parental leave worked less than full-time as at 30 June 2007 (based on full-time equivalent being less than one). Of the 618 women who returned from parental leave during the year, 47% worked less than full-time, compared to 12% in the Public Service as a whole.

 

8 Part-time staff are excluded as their leave entitlements can be affected by the number of days worked (for example 8 days entitlement for an employee working 2 days per week). Annual leave entitlement data has been collected since 2003.

9 The average sick and domestic leave taken excludes staff who terminated during the year and those on Leave Without Pay or on Parental Leave.

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