Executive Summary

Public sector employment growth. While employment growth in the core Public Service has increased more rapidly than other parts of the wider public sector, the overall sector has grown by 11% since 2002 compared with 13% for the labour market as a whole.

Public Service employment growth. Public Service employment increased by 5% in the June 2007 year, giving a total headcount of 44,335 (full-time equivalent of 42,047). The number of permanent staff increased by 2,067 while the number of fixed-term staff reduced by 248. The overall growth of 5% was the same as in the June 2006 year.

Turnover rates. Turnover rates for the Public Service were similar to 2006 figures at 14% for core unplanned turnover and 20% for gross turnover (13% and 22% in 2006 respectively). Turnover rates varied considerably by department (between 5.0% and 33.7% core unplanned turnover) and by occupation.

Annual leave entitlements. Forty-two percent of full-time permanent employees had 25 days annual leave entitlement or more (28% in 2006).

Occupation. The occupational composition of the Public Service differs markedly from the NZ labour market as a whole. Seventy-five percent of public servants are in the professional or clerical and administration occupation groups compared with 31% in these groups for the labour market as a whole.

Salary rates. The median salary for staff as at 30 June 2007 was $48,343 ($45,900 in 2006) and the average salary was $56,619 ($53,948 in 2006).

Proportion of Māori staff. The proportion of Māori staff as at 30 June 2007 was 16.8% (16.7% in 2006) compared with 14.6% in the overall population (2006 Census).

Diversity in senior management. The proportion of senior managers who are Māori was 9.1% (8.2% in 2006). The proportion of senior managers who are women was 37.8% (37.7% in 2006).

 

Background

The information in this paper comes mainly from the Human Resource Capability (HRC) survey, which has collected anonymous unit-record data on staff 1 in Public Service departments since 2000. Data from Statistics New Zealand's labour market surveys is also used to allow comparisons with the labour force as a whole.

This year's survey saw changes in the collection of occupation data from codes in the New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (NZSCO) to codes in the Australia and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO 2 ). Departments recoded every job to the new classification, with technical assistance from the State Services Commission (SSC) and Statistics New Zealand. Some advantages of the changed classification include new occupations that reflect today's labour market (for example many more information technology occupations) and allowing comparisons to other New Zealand or Australian surveys. The recoding process also provided an opportunity for departments to check and improve data accuracy. The disadvantage of the change is that trend analysis becomes difficult, due to major differences between the old and new classifications.

A new data field for department day entitlement 3 was introduced this year to improve reporting on annual leave entitlements. Traditionally department day entitlements were separate from annual leave, however some departments have now incorporated them into annual leave entitlements.

 

1 The survey includes all permanent and temporary employees but does not include contractors or employees who work on a casual or as-required basis.

2 Further information on the new occupation classification is on the Statistics New Zealand website

www.stats.govt.nz/statistical-methods/classifications-and-related-statistical-standards/occupation/default.htm

3 The working days between the Christmas and New Year statutory holidays have tended to be designated as department days.

Staff numbers

Staff numbers in the Public Service

In the year to 30 June 2007, the number of staff in the Public Service increased by 5% to a 44,335 headcount and 42,047 full-time equivalents (FTEs). Staff numbers have grown for seven consecutive years. Table 1 sets out staff numbers for the last five years and shows annual increases have ranged between 5 and 10%.

The increase in staff numbers this year is wholly in permanent staff, as fixed-term staff numbers decreased from a headcount of 3,607 in 2006 to 3,359 in 2007.

Changes in staff numbers varied between departments. The percentage change over the year ranged from -10% for Land Information New Zealand to 20% for the SSC (excluding major machinery of government changes).

Most departments increased staff numbers in the year to 30 June 2007. Twenty six departments reported an increase in the number of staff, three had no change and five departments decreased the number of staff. See Appendix 1 for details of staffing in individual departments since 2002.

Table 1. Public Service employment, 2002-2007

                 
   

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

Headcount

           

Open-term

30,528

32,200

34,477

36,612

38,661

40,976

Fixed-term

2,310

2,245

3,388

3,713

3,607

3,359

Total Headcount

32,838

34,445

37,865

40,325

42,268

44,335

Percentage change

 

5%

10% 4

6%

5%

5%

Full Time Equivalents (FTEs)

           

Open-term

29,514

31,107

33,131

35,231

37,340

39,499

Fixed-term

2,070

2,012

2,514

2,801

2,773

2,548

Total FTE

31,587

33,118

35,645

38,032

40,113

42,047

Percentage change

 

5%

8%

7%

5%

5%

   

Increases in staff numbers at the Inland Revenue Department and the Department of Corrections had the greatest impact on overall Public Service staff numbers in the last year. The majority of additional staff at the Inland Revenue Department were employed to support the implementation of new programmes, for example KiwiSaver. The staff increase in the Department of Corrections results from growth in the Public Prison Service and the Community Probation Service.  The Public Prison Service has commissioned new facilities (Auckland Regional Women's Correction Facility, Otago Regional Correctional Facility and Spring Hill Correctional Facility) while growth in the Community Probation Service reflects a general increase across all locations.

Machinery of government changes have had a significant impact on individual department staff numbers over the last year, in particular with the Child Youth and Family Service being incorporated into the Ministry of Social Development.

Comparison to wider public sector and labour market

As at 30 June 2007 the Public Service made up 14% of total public sector employment, and has grown more rapidly than the other parts of the sector over the last five years. Figure 1 shows the number of employees in 2002 and 2007 for the different parts of the public sector. Over this period the Public Service increased by 35%, Local Government increased by 31%, whereas the Health and Education Services both increased by 8%. Employment in the public sector as a whole increased by 32,445 (11%) compared with an increase of 251,700 (13%) in the employed labour force. At 30 June 2007 the public sector had 324,086 employees.

Figure 1. Number of employees in the public sector, 2002 and 2007

""

Source: Statistics NZ. Quarterly Employment Survey and HRC (2002 and 2007 June quarters)

Staffing by occupation

Occupation reporting has changed this year following the move to the new ANZSCO classification for occupation.

The Public Service has a different mix of occupations than the wider labour market. Table 2 shows the Public Service by the broadest ANZSCO occupation groups. The largest occupation groups in the Public Service are Professionals, and Clerical and Administration workers, which make up 75% of the Public Service. These groups comprise only 31% of the labour market as a whole.

Table 2. ANZSCO Major Groups, 2007 Public Service and 2006 Census

Occupations Major Group (ANZSCO)

Headcount 2007

percentage 2007

Labour Market (2006 Census)

Managers

3,912

9%

17%

Professionals

17,997

41%

19%

Technicians and Trades Workers

1,178

3%

12%

Community and Personal Service Workers

5,828

13%

8%

Clerical and Administration Workers

14,963

34%

12%

Sales Workers

12

0%

9%

Machinery Operators and Drivers

64

0%

6%

Labourers

70

0%

11%

Unknown

311

1%

6%

Total

44,335

   

In previous years, HRC reporting has used specific Public Service occupation groups that were different from the Statistics New Zealand groups. The SSC is looking at whether to create new Public Service occupation groups for the new classification.

 

4 In 2004 1,035 employees were reclassified from casual employees (outside of the survey scope) to permanent or temporary employees. Without this change the percentage increase in Headcount for 2004 would have been 7%.

Recruitment and retention

Turnover

The core unplanned turnover 5 rate for the Public Service in the year to 30 June 2007 was 14% (15% for women, 12% for men) and the gross turnover rate (which includes people on fixed-term employment) was 20%. These rates are similar to those in 2006 (13% core unplanned and 22% gross). Table 3 shows turnover rates for the Public Service from 2002 to 2007.

Table 3. Turnover rates in the Public Service, 2002-2007 (year to 30 June)

 

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

Turnover rates

           

Gross turnover rate

19%

18%

17%

21 %

22 %

20%

Core unplanned turnover rate

11%

11%

12%

14 %

13 %

14%

Turnover rates - by gender

           

Male - core unplanned turnover

10%

9%

10%

12%

12 %

12 %

Female - core unplanned turnover

12%

12%

13%

14%

14 %

15 %

There is no ideal turnover rate and the overall Public Service rate is not unusual or excessive. Individual departments may be concerned about their level of turnover, particularly those departments at the extremes with either very high or very low turnover for the department as a whole, or groups within it. Core unplanned turnover by department varied between 5.0% and 33.7%.

The core unplanned turnover for females to the year to 30 June 2007 was 15% and male turnover was 12 %. The turnover rate for female staff is generally higher than for male staff because they are more likely to leave the workforce to care for dependants. Age is also a factor as younger staff tend to be more mobile than older staff, and in the Public Service women have a younger profile than men.

Turnover rates differ by occupation group (refer to Table 4 below). For the year to 30 June 2007 Public Relations Professionals had the highest core unplanned turnover rate at 29%.

Table 4. Highest and lowest turnover rates by occupation, 2007 (year to 30 June)

         
 

Occupation group - most detailed level

Core unplanned turnover rate

(minimum size of more than 100 current staff and in more than one department)

Highest

>20%

Lowest

<7%

Public Relations Professional

29%

 

Call or Contact Centre Operator

27%

 

Human Resource Advisor

28%

 

ICT Business Analyst

23%

 

Office Manager

 

6%

Corporate Service Manager

 

6%

Training & Development Professional

 

6%

   

Skills supply and demand

At the same time as the SSC undertakes the HRC Survey it also undertakes a qualitative survey, the Skill Shortage Survey. This survey gathers information about the supply and demand for skills in the Public Service.

Results from the 2007 Skill Shortage Survey were similar to previous years and are consistent with the continuation of a tight labour market.

Five or more departments reported skill shortages in the following roles or areas: policy analyst/senior policy analyst, project managers, information technology, human resource advisers, finance and accounting roles. These roles were also considered to be skill shortages in previous years, and are in occupational groups that have higher than average turnover.

The most frequently mentioned occupational group with a skill shortage was information technology.

Methods departments described for dealing with skill shortages included increasing internal capability through training and development, recruiting from overseas, and hiring at a lower level then developing the person into the role. 

Remuneration was the most commonly reported cause of recruitment difficulties. Other factors reported included working conditions. For example, the high workload and long hours required, the lack of career development prospects and negative perceptions of the organisation and the Public Service.

Factors departments reported as affecting their future capability include the impact of the generally tight labour market, an ageing population reducing the supply of skilled applicants and the pressure this may place on remuneration.

Redundancy payments

In the year to June 2007, 169 people received redundancy payments, an increase of six from the previous year (refer to Table 5 below). These payments had an average value of $45,645, up from $37,268 in 2006. Redundancy payments were made by 26 departments with four departments accounting for more than 50% of redundancies.

Table 5. Redundancy payments, 2002 - 2007

Redundancy payments

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

Number of staff receiving

264

188

168

218

163

169

Average payment ($)

36,171

42,804

37,133

40,621

37,268

45,645

 

5 Core unplanned turnover is primarily due to resignations of open-term employees, but also includes retirements, dismissals, and death. Planned turnover includes cessations of staff on fixed-term employment agreements and cessations due to restructuring. The turnover rate for the Public Service is derived from the exits from departments. As a result it includes movements between departments and so the actual level of 'loss' to the Public Service through unplanned exits is below the 14% reported here.

Pay and Benefits

Sector pay movement

Figure 2 shows the pay movements for different sectors between June 2002 and June 2007 using the Labour Cost Index from Statistics New Zealand. Over the past five years, the change in salary and wage rates for the Public Service has been lower than that in the Health and Education sectors and similar to that in the private sector.

Figure 2. Labour Cost Index (LCI) - All Salary and Wage Rates, 2002 to 2007

""

Source: Statistics NZ. Labour Cost Index - All Salary and Wage Rates

Salary rates and performance payments

As at 30 June 2007, the median base salary for public servants was $48,343 ($45,900 in 2006). For males the median salary was $53,387, and for females $45,544, (refer to Table 6 below). The average base salary for public servants was $56,619 ($53,948 in 2006).

Table 6. Base salary of all staff, 2002-2007

 

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

Median salary

$40,192

$41,500

$42,310

$43,700

$45,900

$48,343

Average salary

$45,896

$47,652

$48,915

$50,884

$53,948

$56,619

Percentage change in average salary

4.6%

3.8%

2.7%

4.0%

6.0%

5.0%

Eighteen percent of public servants received lump sum performance payments during the year to 30 June 2007 (18% in 2006). Lump sum performance payments were made by 26 organisations and the average payment 6 was $2,255. Refer to Table 7 below, showing information on performance payments since the information was first collected in 2005.

Table 7. Performance payments, 2005-2007

Lump sum performance payments

2005

2006

2007

Number of staff

8,405

7,432

8,012

Percentage of staff

21%

18%

18%

Average value

$2,592

$2,521

$2,255

Pay gaps

The gender pay gap is defined as the difference between the average salary of women and the average salary of men, and is expressed as a percentage of the average salary of men. The gender pay gap for the Public Service was 16% as at 30 June 2007 (16% in 2006). Since 2002 the gender pay gap has been stable at between 16 and 17 %.

Gender pay gaps within occupation groups are lower than the overall gender pay gap (refer to Table 8 below). The grouping of women into lower paid occupations has been identified by the Pay and Employment Equity Taskforce as a significant contribution to the gender pay gap.

Table 8. Gender pay gaps by occupation

Occupation group

Number of Females

Number of Males

Pay Gap

Managers

1,797

2,115

12.8%

Professionals

10,629

7,366

11.4%

Technicians and Trades Workers

367

811

9.1%

Community and Personal Service Workers

2,549

3,279

13.1%

Clerical and Administrative Workers

10,692

4,269

11.2%

Ethnic pay gaps are defined as the difference between the average salary for an ethnic group and the average salary of those not in that ethnic group, and is expressed as a percentage of the average salary of those not in the ethnic group. Table 9 presents ethnic pay gaps in the Public Service and the wider labour force.

Table 9. Ethnic pay gaps, 2002-2007

 

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

NZ Labour Force comparison - 2007

12%

13%

14%

13%

12%

11%

10%

Pacific peoples

19%

21%

20%

21%

21%

20%

20%

Asian peoples

5%

7%

8%

10%

9%

10%

Not available

Superannuation

As at 30 June 2007, 51% of permanent public servants were members of an employer subsidised superannuation scheme, with 42% belonging to the State Sector Retirement Savings Scheme (SSRSS). Fifteen percent of fixed-term public servants were members of an employer subsidised superannuation scheme, with most belonging to the SSRSS.

The number of SSRSS members in the Public Service as at 30 June 2007 was 5% higher than the previous year. Eighty-eight percent of SSRSS members were contributing 3% or more of their salary to the scheme. The 2007 HRC survey does not include data on KiwiSaver as that scheme commenced after the survey date of 30 June 2007.

 

6 The average payment excludes lump sum performance payments made to chief executives.

Diversity

Ethnicity

Table 10 shows the representation of ethnic groups in the Public Service. After decreasing last year, the proportion of Māori remained flat, moving from 16.7% to 16.8% in 2007. The proportion of Pacific peoples increased slightly to 7.6% in 2007, while the proportion of Asian peoples continued to increase steadily. The Asian ethnic group was the fastest growing ethnic group in the Public Service during the 12 months to June 2007. In contrast, the European ethnic group continued to decrease with 76.3% of Public Servants identifying themselves as European (down from 82.5% in 2002).

Table 10. Representation of ethnic groups 7 in the Public Service, 2002-2007

                   
 

Ethnic group

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2006 Census

Māori

17.6%

17.6%

17.4%

17.5%

16.7%

16.8%

14.6%

Pacific peoples

6.8%

7.1%

7.1%

7.3%

7.4%

7.6%

6.9%

Asian peoples

3.6%

4.2%

4.7%

5.4%

5.9%

6.5%

9.2%

European (including New Zealand European)

82.5%

81.6%

79.4%

79.0%

77.5%

76.3%

67.6%

Middle Eastern, Latin American, African

0.3%

0.3%

0.4%

0.4%

0.5%

0.7%

0.9%

Other Ethnic Group (includes New Zealander from 2006)

1.2%

1.2%

1.4%

1.2%

3.5%

3.5%

11.2%

   

Women in the Public Service

Women comprise a higher proportion of the Public Service than of the labour force as a whole, at 59.2% as at 30 June 2007 (59.4% in 2006). The type of work in the Public Service may explain this high representation as many Public Service occupations (such as social worker, case worker and clerical staff) have high representation of women in the labour market. Appendix 2 shows the percentage of women in each department.

The age profile of men and women in the Public Service differs. The average age of women as at 30 June 2007 was 41.5 whereas the average age of men was 43.9. A higher proportion of women (18.3%) were aged 20-29 compared with men (13.4%).

Diversity in senior management

Table 11 shows that the proportion of senior managers who are Māori increased in the 2007 year to just over 9%. The proportion of senior managers who are women, Pacific people and Asian people were in line with 2006 figures.

Table 11. Diversity in senior management, 2002-2007

Group

2002

%

2003

%

2004

%

2005

%

2006

%

2007

%

Māori

10.4

10.3

10.1

8.3

8.2

9.1

Pacific peoples

1.6

1.4

1.3

1.7

1.7

1.7

Asian peoples

1.5

1.4

1.3

1.5

1.6

1.5

Women

35.5

35.1

36.2

35.6

37.7

37.8

Disability

Data from the 2006 Household Disability Survey (Statistics New Zealand) shows that 8% of employees in the Public Administration and Safety industry group had a disability, compared to 13% for all people aged 15 to 65 years. The Public Service represents just over half of staff numbers in the Public Administration and Safety industry group. Disability data has not been collected in the HRC survey since 2005.

 

7 Ethnicity is recorded and reported based on the Statistics New Zealand "Statistical Standard for Ethnicity 2005". People recording more than one ethnic group are double counted. Percentages in Table 10 are of those with a known ethnicity.

Leave

Annual and department day entitlements

The proportion of full-time permanent Public Service employees receiving 25 days or more annual leave as at 30 June 2007 was 42% (28% in 2006). Recent legislative changes that increased the minimum statutory annual leave entitlement appear to have had a flow-on effect leading to increased Public Service entitlements. Refer to Table 12 below for annual leave entitlements since 2003, when this information was first collected in the survey.

Table 12. Annual and departmental day leave entitlements, 2003-2007 (% of permanent full-time staff only 8 )

             
 

Annual leave entitlement

Combined annual & departmental day entitlement

 

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2007

<20 days

30

31

23

12

0

0

20 days

44

45

39

48

35

16

21-22 days

7

7

8

10

12

3

23-24 days

9

8

10

2

11

31

25 days

5

4

15

24

29

30

26 days or more

5

5

5

4

13

20

This year the HRC Survey started collecting departmental day leave entitlement information. These days traditionally covered the working days between the Christmas and New Year statutory holidays. The data shows that in 2007 59% of employees did not receive any departmental day entitlement and 34% received three days entitlement.

The majority (83%) of those employees who were entitled to 23 days or more annual leave had no departmental day entitlement, which may indicate departmental days had been incorporated into their annual leave entitlement.

When adding annual leave and departmental day entitlements together, just over half (50.3%) of permanent full time public service staff were entitled to 25 days or more leave a year.

Sick leave taken

In the year to 30 June 2007, full-time permanent employees took on average 6.5 days of sick and domestic leave 9 , (average of 6.6 days in 2006). Since 2003, when collecting the data started, the average sick leave taken has been stable, ranging between 6.5 and 6.9 days.

Parental leave

As at 30 June 2007, there were 605 employees on parental leave, of whom 589 were female and 16 male (2006 figures were 573 total, 555 females and 18 males).

During the year to 30 June 2007, 718 employees completed a period of parental leave and 100 (14%) of these employees were men. The average length of parental leave for women was 212 calendar days (approximately 7 months) compared with 47 calendar days for men.

A high proportion of employees who had recently returned from parental leave worked less than full-time as at 30 June 2007 (based on full-time equivalent being less than one). Of the 618 women who returned from parental leave during the year, 47% worked less than full-time, compared to 12% in the Public Service as a whole.

 

8 Part-time staff are excluded as their leave entitlements can be affected by the number of days worked (for example 8 days entitlement for an employee working 2 days per week). Annual leave entitlement data has been collected since 2003.

9 The average sick and domestic leave taken excludes staff who terminated during the year and those on Leave Without Pay or on Parental Leave.

Appendix 1: Full-time equivalent number of employees, 2002-2007

Department

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

% change 2006-2007 10

Agriculture & Forestry

1219

1291

1355

1480

1556

1592

2%

Archives

110

109

109

100

100

109

9%

Building & Housing 11

129

142

151

215

306

332

9%

Child, Youth & Family Services

2154

2187

2463

2663

2831

-

-

Conservation

1727

1763

1838

1891

1954

1996

2%

Corrections

4266

4285

4620

5113

5600

6332

13%

Crown Law Office

126

129

141

152

153

173

13%

Culture and Heritage

54

57

70

72

86

89

4%

Customs

771

838

1039

1199

1177

1198

2%

Defence

49

52

57

54

58

59

1%

Economic Development

725

653

700

697

716

686

-4%

Education

1742

1849

2297

2449

2442

2554

5%

Education Review Office

180

173

199

227

246

233

-5%

Environment

138

172

219

222

249

266

6%

Fisheries

313

336

366

372

409

437

7%

Foreign Affairs & Trade

610

622

636

664

699

723

3%

Government Communications Security Bureau

-

253

276

295

293

292

0%

Health

818

1012

1085

1061

1157

1278

10%

Inland Revenue Department

4418

4523

4580

4760

5224

5595

7%

Internal Affairs

940

984

1063

1098

1223

1268

4%

Justice 12

2160

2254

2348

2574

2733

2852

4%

Labour

1081

1199

1322

1371

1546

1608

4%

Land Information New Zealand

614

583

552

546

563

504

-10%

Māori Development

302

343

335

342

366

391

7%

National Library

364

357

358

353

367

352

-4%

Pacific Island Affairs

42

44

53

52

49

49

0%

Prime Minister & Cabinet

103

105

110

114

106

109

3%

Research, Science & Technology

49

59

62

69

68

71

4%

Serious Fraud Office

33

33

33

29

29

29

0%

Social Development 13

5106

5505

5903

6412

6299

9323

2% 14

State Services Commission

153

154

155

153

180

215

20%

Statistics New Zealand

654

604

690

709

800

786

-2%

Transport 15

66

68

74

128

146

150

2%

Treasury

307

326

330

337

324

330

2%

Women's Affairs

32

20

25

26

29

34

17%

Total 16

31585

33118

35645

38032

40113

42047

5%

 

10 Percentages have been calculated using un-rounded numbers.

11 The Ministry of Housing was renamed the Department of Building & Housing on 1 November 2004 and additional functions added. On 1 July 2005 the Weathertight Homes Resolution Service transferred to the Department of Building & Housing from the Department of Internal Affairs.

12 The Ministry of Justice includes numbers for the former Department for Courts for 2002 and 2003.

13 The Ministry of Social Development includes numbers for the former Ministry of Youth Affairs for 2002 and 2003.

14 The percentage change for the Ministry of Social Development is calculated using a 2006 figure that includes the Ministry as well as the former Department of Child, Youth & Family Services.

15 The Ministry of Transport had additional functions added in the 2004/2005 year.

16 Totals include chief executives, who are not part of the departmental figures.

Appendix 2: Gender and employment agreement by department - June 2007

Department

Women

% on a current collective agreement

% on expired collective

% on an individual

Agriculture & Forestry

46%

53%

0%

47%

Archives

62%

63%

0%

37%

Building & Housing

57%

28%

0%

72%

Conservation

37%

66%

0%

34%

Corrections

39%

64%

0%

35%

Crown Law Office

69%

51%

0%

49%

Culture and Heritage

59%

0%

48%

52%

Customs

39%

60%

0%

40%

Defence

28%

0%

0%

100%

Economic Development

54%

21%

0%

79%

Education

81%

27%

18%

56%

Education Review Office

73%

74%

0%

26%

Environment

58%

43%

0%

57%

Fisheries

35%

38%

0%

62%

Foreign Affairs & Trade

54%

67%

1%

31%

Government Communications Security Bureau

30%

0%

72%

28%

Health

63%

18%

1%

81%

Inland Revenue Department

66%

68%

0%

32%

Internal Affairs

54%

18%

15%

68%

Justice

66%

13%

51%

37%

Labour

58%

45%

0%

55%

Land Information New Zealand

41%

42%

0%

58%

Māori Development

59%

28%

0%

72%

National Library

71%

69%

0%

31%

Pacific Island Affairs

43%

0%

0%

100%

Prime Minister & Cabinet

56%

0%

0%

100%

Research, Science & Technology

55%

0%

0%

100%

Serious Fraud Office

43%

0%

0%

100%

Social Development

73%

63%

0%

37%

State Services Commission

60%

0%

2%

98%

Statistics New Zealand

53%

0%

49%

51%

Transport

53%

36%

0%

64%

Treasury

48%

0%

0%

100%

Women's Affairs

86%

32%

0%

68%

Total 17

59%

49%

7%

44%

17 Includes chief executives, who are not included in the departmental figures.

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