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Sick and domestic leave taken

Sick and domestic leave taken can be used as an indicator of organisational health. High levels can indicate staff disengagement or intention to leave, although there are many other factors that influence sick and domestic leave use, such as age, gender and occupation. In the year to 30 June 2015, Public Service employees took, on average, 8.0 days of sick and domestic leave, up from 7.7 days in 2014. 

Table 5.3 Sick and domestic leave taken, June year 2011-2015
 

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Average sick and domestic leave taken (days)

7.4

7.6

7.9

7.7

8.0 R

R: Revised (refer to footnote in Appendix 3).

As shown in Table 5.4, sick and domestic leave use is affected by the occupational makeup of the workforce - overall front line occupational groups such as contact centre operators and social, health and education workers take more sick leave than policy or manager roles. The average amount of sick and domestic leave taken varies by department from 4 to 15 days. Data on sick and domestic days taken by department is provided in Appendix 3.

Table 5.4 Sick and domestic leave taken by occupational group, June year 2015

HRC customised occupation groups Average sick and domestic leave taken (days)

Managers

5.6 R

Policy Analysts

4.9

Information Professionals

7.3 R

Social, Health and Education Workers

9.6

ICT Professionals and Technicians

7.4

Legal, HR and Finance Professionals

5.8

Other Professionals not elsewhere included

6.1 R

Inspectors and Regulatory Officers

8.8

Contact Centre Workers

10.5

Clerical and Administrative Workers

8.0 R

R: Revised (refer to footnote in Appendix 3).

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