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What is the "It takes three: operating expectations framework"?

The Crown entity system relies on Ministers, entities and monitoring departments working well together. Effective engagement requires clarity about respective roles and responsibilities and a shared understanding of "how" legislative obligations are put into practice. In short, it takes all three parts of the government working together to effectively deliver the services that New Zealanders deserve.

The "It takes three: operating expectations framework" sets out in one place the roles, responsibilities and operating expectations for all three parties (Ministers, entities and monitoring departments). These expectations are aligned horizontally so that at each stage of the process, each party can see what is expected of the others.

There are four main guiding principles, as outlined below.

Principle 1: clear roles and responsibilities

All parties fulfill their critical roles and responsibilities so that they:

  • have a shared understanding of their roles and responsibilities between the parties, in line with relevant legislation
  • meet all statutory accountabilities, and
  • adhere to the "no surprises" convention

Principle 2: strategic alignment

Policies are strategically aligned so that:

  • relevant agencies are driven by the same principles and contribute toward the same outcomes, and
  • there is cross-government engagement with Crown entities and other parts of the relevant sector.

Principle 3: efficient and effective monitoring

A customised approach, proportional to the profile of each organisation, is taken to:

  • performance monitoring
  • data collection
  • assessing and managing risk, and
  • resource management

in order to enhance entity performance.

Principle 4: trusted engagement

The parties commit to good practice to ensure their relationships are trusting and productive.

How does this operating expectations framework work?

Statutory Crown entities work to three sets of expectations:

  • The Enduring Letter of Expectations from the Ministers of Finance and State Services
  • Ministerial expectations, which inform entities' strategic direction over the next four years (set out in their Statements of Intent) and priorities for the coming year (set out in their Statements of Performance Expectations), and
  • Operating expectations, which guide engagement between the statutory entity, its responsible Minister and the monitoring department. These are intended to help the parties achieve trusting, productive relationships.

Within the operating expectations framework there are four guiding principles:

1. Clear roles and responsibilities

2. Strategic alignment

3. Efficient and effective monitoring, and

4. Trusted engagement.

Each guiding principle contains a set of working principles, for which specific expectations of each party are laid out. The operating expectations framework allows you to:

  • check your own roles and responsibilities and the associated expectations
  • cross-check them against the roles and responsibilities of the other parties, and
  • access supporting resources (including legislation, guidance, expert advice and examples of good practice).

For each operating expectation, narrative and links to further information and resources are included. These links enable access to up to date user guides designed to meet the needs of:

  • Ministers, and their staff
  • Crown entities boards and staff
  • monitoring departments.

Why have an operating expectations framework?

This principles-based framework is to help Ministers, statutory entities and monitoring departments improve the way they work together to achieve better results for New Zealanders.

The work of Crown entities is immensely important for achieving results for New Zealanders. Crown entities supply many of the services provided to New Zealanders, and so delivering services better requires the government and Crown entities to work well together. To get the best results from government investment in Crown entities, a productive three-way relationship is needed between the responsible Minister, the statutory entity and the monitoring department. All parties in the engagement process need to understand the system as a whole and where they fit within it. The operating expectations framework sets out in one place how the respective roles and responsibilities underpinning those relationships are aligned. It is a tool for Ministers, statutory entity board members and staff, and monitoring departments to:

  • understand the system and the organisation's place in it, and
  • contribute to building productive relationships in the sector between responsible Ministers, the monitoring departments and Crown entities.

Statutory Crown entities are part of the wider State sector. Changes were made in 2013 to the Crown Entities Act along with the State Sector Act, and the Public Finance Act to support the emphasis on agencies working together. From 2013 the Crown Entities Act:

  • requires entities to collaborate where practicable
  • removes the default annual approach to Statements of Intent and allows for these to cover intentions for a three year period, and
  • enables directions to support an all-of-government approach to be applied in a more targeted way.

The amendments also provide greater clarity about the role of monitoring departments and streamlined reporting. Changes in the law alone, however, will not drive changes in behaviour. Improving the way the three parties work together will achieve the intent of the legislative changes.

How do the expectations relate to Crown entities' accountabilities?

Crown entities are part of the State sector. The Crown Entities Act specifies the accountability regime applying to Crown entities. Entities are accountable to government through their Minister. Their performance is monitored, as is that of all other State sector entities. The operating expectations framework has been designed to assist all three parties understand their roles and responsibilities and deliver on their legal accountabilities.

Work in the UK on arm's-length public bodies identified four critical requirements for accountability to be effective:

Clarity of accountability Knowing what you are accountable for, and to whom you are accountable. These accountabilities must be documented and publicly available.
Sufficiency of control Having sufficient control over the things which you are held responsible for.
Clarity of consequences Being aware of the likely consequences that will result from carrying out responsibilities at above or below defined levels (and consequences should be proportionate).
Sufficiency of information Enough information must be available to judge whether responsibilities have been performed.

 

Source: Institute for Government, Accountability at the Top: Supporting Effective Leadership in Whitehall (2013), www.instituteforgovernment.org.uk/publications/accountability-top.

PRINCIPLE 1: Clear roles and responsibilities

All parties fulfil their critical roles and responsibilities so that they: have a shared understanding of their statutory roles and responsibilities; meet all statutory accountabilities; and adhere to the 'no surprises' convention

See: the 'working principles' for Principle 1, listed in the 'Contents', to the left.

Understand the Crown Entities Act 2004 and the 'arm's-length' regime

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • understands his or her responsibilities in relation to the Crown entity model and provisions of the Crown Entities Act

  • understands the constraints on intervention in the entity’s statutorily independent functions

  • engages with the chair and board on priorities, and understands constraints on Ministerial intervention in the entity’s operational decisions

  • understands that despite being legally separate from the Crown, it is part of the State services and owned by the Crown

  • understands its own responsibilities in relation to the Crown entity model and provisions of the Crown Entities Act

  • board understands its role as governor of the entity and primary monitor of entity performance

  • understands the Department's role in representing a wider set of sector and system interests (e.g. in the context of Better Public Services), and in commenting on any matter in support of the Minister's role

  • assesses and manages risks

  • understands its own responsibilities in relation to the Crown entity model and provisions of the Crown Entities Act

  • recognises the primacy of the board’s role as monitor of entity performance

  • works with the entity to communicate the wider set of interests it represents (in the context of Better Public Services)

  • understands the constraints on Ministerial and Department intervention in the entity’s statutorily independent functions

  • supports Ministerial engagement with the chair and board on priorities and understands its own role in commenting on any matter in support of the Minister's role 

  • customises its expectations framework in respect to the entity and develops resources to promote good practice in the relevant portfolio environment

Produce meaningful public accountability documents

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • engages with the entity on whether the statement of intent remains fit-for-purpose

  • provides timely feedback to the entity on accountability documents and advises the Minister during the process

Focus on contributing to Government's goals for State services

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • explains to the entity the Government’s goals for State services

  • works with the entity to review its responsiveness to those goals

Understand the roles of other important parties

The responsible Minister      The Crown entity Monitoring department

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2: Section 107 of the Crown Entities Act empowers the Minister of State Services and Minister of Finance to jointly direct Crown entities to support a whole-of-government approach by complying with specified requirements.

3: The three central agencies – State Services Commission, the Treasury, and the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet – work together as a "corporate centre" to lead a State sector that New Zealanders trust, and that delivers Better Public Services, including outstanding results and value for money.

Respond to select committees

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department

Appoint and maintain effective boards

 

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • chair raises with the Minister and Department issues of board performance and the balance of the board’s skills, knowledge, experience, and (where relevant) representativeness

  • chair provides input to the Minister’s decisions on new appointments or reappointments, including advice on succession planning

Induct the chair

 

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • briefs the incoming chair on Ministerial expectations

  • ensures the chair is advised on the Minister’s priority areas of interest, and assists the entity to induct the chair, as appropriate

Induct board members

 

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • chair ensures all board members attend a Crown governance induction as early as possible in their term of appointment

  • chair ensures new board members are well inducted into the work of the entity

  • offers to induct (or facilitates the induction of) new board members into the Crown governance environment

  • considers information gaps and overlaps in the material and induction process and identifies which matters would be best covered by the Department, the entity itself, the State Services Commission, the Treasury, or the Office of the Auditor-General

Build and maintain board performance

 

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • regularly assesses its understanding of governance in the State sector generally and the Crown entity environment specifically

  • chair ensures there is an active programme to develop board skills and performance

  • assesses its capability needs on a regular basis and/or at times of material change to its operating environment

  • provides the entity with ongoing, tailored support on governance in the Crown entity environment

  • provides (or facilitates provision of) other support as requested by the chair or board members

Assess board performance

 

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • has a governance assessment programme, including a good-practice self-review and assessment of board performance led by the chair

  • chair seeks independent advice on managing a self-review and assessment

  • advises the Minister of findings of self-review and assessment and the board’s views on capability needs and proposed actions

  • provides assistance, if requested, to support the board’s self-review and assessment processes

  • uses high level information from board self-review and assessment to develop its advice to the Minister on board performance, where appropriate

  • ensures information from board self-review and assessment is treated confidentially at all times

Balance the board-management relationship

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • ensures systems are in place to update the board chair on outcomes from Minister’s meetings with the chief executive

  • provides a link between the entity chief executive and the Minister when relevant issues arise

PRINCIPLE 2: Strategic alignment

Policies are strategically aligned so that: relevant agencies are driven by the same principles and contribute toward the same outcomes; and there is cross-government engagement with Crown entities and other parts of the relevant sector

See: the 'working principles' for Principle 2, listed in the 'Contents', to the left.

Focus on contributing to the Government's wider policy priorities

 

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • understands its expected contribution to wider Government priorities and factors it into planning

  • supports current policy settings with external parties

  • uses an evidence-based approach to identify and advise on the entity’s contribution to achieving the Government’s wider priorities

Connect with work in other portfolios

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • actively engages with other Ministers on sector issues affected by work in other portfolios

  • actively looks for opportunities to engage with other Ministers on issues affected by their own portfolio

  • understands Government policies that affect its sector

  • works with the Department to provide the Minister with timely advice on relevant cross-portfolio issues

  • understands Government policies that affect the entity’s sector

  • works with the entity to provide the Minister with timely advice on relevant cross-portfolio issues

  • looks across departmental boundaries to build partnerships with government agencies whose work affects the Minister’s portfolio interests

Coordinate work within the portfolio

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • ensures the entity’s activities are well coordinated and coherent with others in the portfolio

  • actively engages with other portfolio entities as required to ensure coordinated and coherent action

  • leads action to ensure that entities within the portfolio are well coordinated and take coherent action

Engage on strategic aims and priorities

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • engages with the entity in a meaningful and timely manner on strategic aims and priorities and the overall use of the entity’s resources to achieve these over the next four years

  • confirms that the draft Statement of Intent (SOI) reflects their own expectations

  • ensures ongoing review of the entity’s multi-year strategic plans

  • engages with the Minister in a meaningful and timely manner on the entity’s strategic aims and priorities

  • proposes interventions based on a plausible and transparent intervention logic or theory of change

  • during the development of the SOI, engages with the Department on its structure and content

  • advises the Minister on the overall use of its resources to achieve its strategic aims and priorities over the next four years, in its draft SOI

  • advises the Minister on any identified capacity and capability risks to policy and/or service delivery

  • ensures the draft SOI reflects the Minister’s expectations

  • puts systems in place to ensure ongoing review of its multi-year SOI and annual SPE

  • understands that the Minister can ask for a new SOI at anytime

  • ensures policy intentions are clear and based on evidence about the issue

  • advises on whether proposed interventions are based on a plausible and transparent intervention logic and theory of change

  • advises the Minister on the fit between the entity’s strategic aims and priorities and overall use of resources, and the Minister’s objectives

  • advises the Minister in the event that the entity has concerns about its capacity or capability

  • provides the entity with feedback on whether the draft SOI reflects the Minister’s expectations and responds to feedback from the Office of the Auditor-General

  • puts systems in place to ensure ongoing review of the entity’s multi-year SOI and annual SPE

Include the entity in relevant policy work

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • ensures the entity is involved in policy decisions affecting its areas of work

  • contributes to policy discussions as an expert partner

  • takes a ‘big sectoral picture’ approach to its policy work

  • respects confidences when invited to provide input to policy development

  • discusses any disagreement about current policy settings with the Minister in private, to preserve confidence in the entity as part of a politically neutral State sector

  • exercises good practice in policy design, development, analysis, implementation and evaluation

  • advises the entity of its own priorities

  • seeks expert input from the entity on policy design and implementation

  • ensures the entity’s research capacity is appropriately harnessed to inform policy development

Involve the sector in designing and implementing policies

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • recognises the importance of engaging the sector in designing and implementing policy goals and delivery programmes

  • seeks feedback from the sector on the entity’s performance

  • actively engages with sector organisations and communities in designing and implementing policy goals and delivery programmes and achieves agreed approaches

  • looks across entity/sectoral boundaries to build partnerships necessary to success

  • has systems in place to manage productive engagement with sector stakeholders

  • informs the entity of its sector engagement intentions

Build wider relationships to support policy interests

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • builds critical relationships with the private sector to obtain better results for the entity and the sector

  • works effectively with other government agencies, NGOs and the private sector to advance wider policy interests

  • assists the Minister and/or the entity in engaging with other parties to advance wider policy interests

PRINCIPLE 3: Efficient and effective monitoring

A customised approach, proportional to the profile of each organisation, is taken to performance monitoring, data collection, assessing and managing risk, and resource management in order to enhance entity performance.

See: the 'working principles' for Principle 3, listed in the 'Contents', to the left.

Authorise the monitoring department

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • ensures a formal delegation is in place under s.27(4) or s.88(5) of the Crown Entities Act so it is clear that the monitoring department has the authority to request information

  • recognises that the Government expects effective monitoring of ‘arm’s-length’ agencies including of activities not directly funded by government

  • understands the role of the Department under:

    • s.27A of the Crown Entities Act

    • s.35(b) of the Public Finance Act 1989

  • drafts the letter of delegation that confirms its status as monitoring department and Ministerial expectations

  • ensures the entity understands the role of the Department under:

    • s.27A of the Crown Entities Act

    • s.35(b) of the Public Finance Act 1989

Ensure effective and customised performance monitoring

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • provides timely advice to the entity and Department on the entity’s output priorities for the next financial year

  • clarifies the Department’s monitoring priorities

  • clarifies their reporting expectations to the entity and Department

  • provides timely feedback to the entity and Department on performance reports

  • ensures the entity and Department understand the consequences of under- or non-performance

  • actively involves the Department in developing the framework for reporting on its annual and longer term performance

  • ensures its monitoring practice:

    • seeks information that supports progress towards policy results

    • confirms that performance reporting data is aligned with the entity’s internal management data

    • sets a reporting timetable with proportional compliance costs that ensures performance is clearly demonstrated

    • supports the Minister’s relationship with the entity

  • ensures the Minister’s information needs are met

  • builds the Minister’s trust in its own performance as the monitoring department

Identify information critical to good performance assessment

 

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • approves the critical data set that informs the achievement of policy and operational goals

  • before the beginning of each financial year, agrees with the Department on the critical data set 4 to ensure the entity is clear about data collection priorities and costs

  • seeks only performance information that it needs and that informs reports to the Minister and the central agencies

  • before the beginning of the financial year, agrees with the entity on the critical data set to ensure the entity is clear about data collection priorities and costs


4: This includes qualitative and quantitative data and the extent to which they interact.

Manage cross-government information requests

 

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • remains aware of cross-government information 5

  • ensures requests for information directed to the entity and Department about entity issues allow sufficient time for a quality response, subject to urgent requests such as oral parliamentary questions

  • provides timely and considered responses to cross-government information requests from the Minister and Department

  • provides timely and considered responses to cross-government information requests from the Minister

.


5: Cross-government information includes, but is not restricted to, information on responsiveness to iwi/Māori, Pacific peoples and people with disabilities.

Manage additional information requests

 

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • ensures (when practicable) that requests for additional information directed to the entity and Department about entity issues are reasonable and allow sufficient time for a quality response

  • recognises that additional requests for information may be made and complies with them in a timely manner

  • ensures its requests for additional information from the entity are reasonable 6

  • ensures processes linked to requests for additional information are managed well and in a timely manner


6: The Department should set out its regular requirements for information from the entity. For example, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage typically seeks information on collaboration with other agencies (twice yearly), activity to support te reo Māori (annually) and activity to support Pacific peoples (annually), and an annual review of business continuity plans (BCPs). Other ad hoc reports or feedback may be sought for, for example, the four-year budget plan, Briefings for Incoming Ministers, select committee questions for the Estimates examination, and draft versions of the Department’s SOI.

Assess performance-related information

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • considers reports provided on the achievement of short- and longer term objectives

  • regularly seeks independent advice on the entity’s progress against strategic goals and performance expectations

  • ensures the board receives high quality information on progress against:

  • assesses the cost effectiveness and cost benefit of its own activities

  • provides the Minister and Department with appropriate performance reports to an agreed timetable

  • clearly informs the Minister about ongoing progress against strategic goals and performance expectations and reflects it in the annual report

  • works with the entity to ensure performance reports provide sufficient detail on progress against:

  • develops metrics to identify strengths and weaknesses in the entity’s performance

  • provides the Minister with timely and practical advice on the entity’s progress against strategic goals and performance expectations

  • gives feedback to the entity on how performance reporting data is used

Ensure information is sound

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department

     

  • regularly reviews data quality to ensure that data is reliable and fit for purpose

  • provides the entity with timely signals when it has concerns about performance information

  • works with the entity annually to review targeted aspects of data integrity

Inform the public about performance

 

The Crown entity Monitoring department

 


7: CAB Min (12) 16/10, and in particular paragraph 140: ‘that statutory Crown entities be required to disclose non-sensitive entity performance information throughout the year via their websites so transparency can be used to support performance improvement and public monitoring’.

Assess and manage risks

 

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • has a good understanding of the fiscal and reputational risks the entity faces

  • informs the Minister of Finance and the chair of potential and material risks to the Crown’s interests

  • when potential risks to the entity’s operations are identified, informs the entity as soon as is appropriate

  • develops a risk assessment and management system appropriate to its business and constituency

  • shares its register of material risks with the Department

  • focuses on continually assessing and managing the most significant risks in order to achieve maximum benefit 8

  • identifies, quantifies, analyses, mitigates and reports project and operational risks

  • identifies potential risks to the entity’s and Crown’s interests and informs the Minister of them

  • advises the Minister of the contingent risks facing the entity and its sector, where applicable

  • seeks information to identify risks to the entity, to facilitate risk monitoring and response

  • scans for and acts on emerging risks that may require a response


8: Often referred to as the 80/20 rule or Pareto Principle: the organisation assesses and manages the largest 20 percent of all risks in order to achieve 80 percent of the total achievable benefit.

Apply performance levers

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • understands and makes use of levers 9 available to obtain desired performance, including but not restricted to

    • meetings with the board chair and/or chief executive

    • letters of expectation to the board chair

    • requests for information at any time

    • directing the board chair to a particular action unless precluded by another Act

    • lead a process to amend legislation

    • tightening and/or reprioritising the monitoring regime

    • commission a review of an entity’s performance

    • obtaining a court order

    • appointing new board members

    • not reappointing board members

    • initiating the removal of board members

  • chair understands the range of levers available to the Minister to obtain the performance the Minister wants

  • practises risk assessment, including assessing the Minister’s likely response to particular actions or results

  • when appropriate, briefs the Minister on available levers to obtain desired performance

  • under the ‘no surprises’ convention, ensures the entity is aware of its actions or aspect(s) of performance that may trigger the Minister’s use of particular levers


9: See our Performance Levers for Ministers document for more information.

Manage operating resources responsibly

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • approves priorities for the year and clarifies their expectations with regard to improving the entity’s efficiency and effectiveness

  • ensures it has data to show that its choices are based on assessment of:

  • tracks the entity’s finances over time and understands its cost drivers

  • collects data that enables it to assess the entity’s operational choices with regard to:

    • cost effectiveness

    • relationship of costs to benefits

    • opportunity costs

Maintain accountability for sector funding

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • where relevant, ensures sector funders 10 understand the importance of effective accountability for such funding

  • where relevant, acts as a sector funder and implements effective good-practice accountability arrangements for its sector funding

  • seeks regular updates on the effectiveness of sector funding accountability arrangements, where relevant


10: For example, the cultural sector funders are: Sport NZ, Creative New Zealand, New Zealand On Air and the New Zealand Film Commission.

Manage capital and reserves

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • where applicable, clarifies their expectations regarding the use of capital

  • where applicable, manages its public equity as planned and informs the Minister as early as possible if equity levels are compromised

  • where applicable, tracks the entity’s use of capital and reserves over time

Focus on controlling costs and ensure maximum resources hit the "front line"

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • makes their expectations clear to the entity

  • provides the Department with up-to-date data on operational costs 11

  • uses this data to ensure that resources are maintained for delivery of services

  • tracks the entity’s revenue and expenditure patterns over time

  • assesses the entity’s service performance against expenditure over time


11: Some departments have developed tools for this purpose. For example, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage has developed an Understanding Agency Costs (UAC) tool, based on the Treasury’s Better Administration and Support Services (BASS) tool, which assists with and supports value-for-money assessment, target-setting, and tracking of improvement over time. It also provides a picture of each function across entities.

PRINCIPLE 4: Trusted engagement

The parties commit to good practice to ensure their relationships are trusting and productive 

See: the 'working principles' for Principle 4, listed in the 'Contents', to the left.

Build and maintain relationships

 

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • invests time in building a productive working relationship with the entity’s chair and senior management

  • ensures the Department is aware of Ministerial communication with the entity

  • ensures the entity is given advance notice of sector stakeholder meetings, and invites its advice

  • offers to induct a new Minister into the work of the entity, including meeting the board

  • recognises the Department’s different roles as ‘friendly critic’ and ‘supporter’

  • communicates the focus of the Department’s monitoring priorities to relevant entity managers

  • fosters trusted working relationships with critical senior Department staff to facilitate the full, free and frank exchange of information on day-to-day and strategic activity

  • actively invests time and effort to strengthen relationships with the Department

  • briefs the Department in advance on major new initiatives or changes in priorities and seeks feedback

  • ensures a new Minister receives an early, accurate and balanced briefing on the entity

  • ensures Department staff understand and respect the ‘arm’s-length’ principle, and when the Department should be acting as ‘friendly critic’ or ‘supporter’

  • builds its relationship-management capacity to ensure skilled, knowledgeable and credible staff manage and nurture relationships with the entity

  • is open in its dealings with the entity

  • with the entity, develops and adheres to joint communications protocols

Ensure there are no surprises

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • understands and applies the ‘no surprises’ convention in advising the entity about information that could affect its operations

  • understands and applies the ‘no surprises’ convention in dealing with the Minister and Department

  • understands and applies the ‘no surprises’ convention in dealing with the entity and Minister

Ensure effective meetings

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • establishes and keeps to a realistic and achievable timetable of meetings with the entity and Department officials

  • ensures the entity and Department are well informed about the Minister’s views on agenda topics

  • prepares well for meetings with the Minister, ensuring agendas are concise and focus on a few important (usually strategic) issues

  • before meetings, provides the Minister with concise briefing papers on critical agenda items

  • informs the Department of agenda items and the entity’s position

  • when required, provides the Minister’s office with timely advice on agenda items

  • confirms with the entity matters of fact or matters on which the Department may have a differing opinion (in accordance with the ‘no surprises’ convention)

  • has a scheduled programme of meetings with the chair, chief executive, designated liaison staff and topic-specific staff, where appropriate

Invest in relationship-management skills

The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • ensures staff in critical relationship-management positions have the appropriate skills to ensure productive relationships with the Department

  • provides staff with professional development opportunities focused on relationship management generally and within the State sector specifically

  • provides relevant career paths that demonstrate that it values staff with highly developed relationship-management skills

  • ensures staff in critical relationship-management positions have the appropriate skills to ensure productive relationships with the entity

  • provides staff with professional development opportunities focused on relationship management generally and within the State sector specifically

  • provides relevant career paths that demonstrate that it values staff with highly developed relationship- management skills

Induct entity and Department staff

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department

     

  • inducts new monitoring advisors in the Department into the entity’s work and management practices

  • offers induction to entity staff and managers on the Department’s work and management practice

Manage escalation where different views exist

The responsible Minister The Crown entity Monitoring department
  • ensures critical issues are escalated to appropriate colleagues including:

    • sector Ministers

    • the Minister of Finance

    • the Minister of State Services

    • the Prime Minister

    • Cabinet

  • agrees with the Department on ‘first points of contact’ and an escalation process in order to respond to differences of opinion in a timely and effective manner

  • when critical issues arise, makes personal contact with relevant Department staff in a timely manner

  • actively works to resolve differences of opinion with the Department

  • follows the agreed escalation process if a dispute persists

  • agrees with the entity, and internally, on ‘first points of contact’ and an escalation process to ensure the Minister’s office is kept apprised of any difference of opinion

  • when critical issues arise, makes personal contact with relevant entity staff in a timely manner

  • actively works to resolve differences of opinion with the entity

  • follows the agreed escalation process if a dispute persists

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